Polisson

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A new site has been created to translate some of the current news and communiques coming out of France about occupations, squats, strikes, abolishing prisons and other relevant information about the movement there. It’s called Polisson.

an image from the article: Daily Work - Nocturne Attack

One Response to “Polisson”

  1. french Says:

    About the CPE movement and student movement in 2006, in France you can read in english:

    http://libcom.org/library/the-anti-cpe-struggle-report-theorie-communiste

    …”The first occupation, of the Sorbonne university, was both a failure and a success. It was a failure because the administration answered the occupation by an immediate blockade: a few dozens of students were left isolated in a lecture theatre watched by university ‘vigiles’. But this blockade was then turned by hundreds of demonstrators, not all of them students, who entered by force in the building. The State reaction was immediate, the government did not want to let the Sorbonne become the rallying point which the occupants wanted it to be. The ‘rectorat’ (university administration for all Paris) explicitly justified the expulsion by the fact that non-students had joined the occupation. It was a success because of its repercussion inside the movement, even if the Sorbonne occupation did not aim to be a ‘symbolic’ act.

    The occupation of the EHESS (School of High Studies in Social Sciences), permitted by the apparent complicity of some students of this institution, happened just after the Sorbonne occupation. The assembly which met during the four evenings of the occupation included around four hundred people (given the strong turnover, a few thousand people went to the EHESS, either during the assemblies, or at an other moment of the day). The assembly was held at 7 pm to allow people who worked to participate. There was in fact an important presence of precarious young people working in restaurants and fast foods and other temp workers. The opponents to the movement and the observers (by definition journalists) were not allowed. The assembly was rather a ‘forum’ than a ‘sovereign or ‘decision making’ authority. A decision only became valid if one fraction of the participants decided to make it effective….”

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